Terminal apps vs graphical apps

I’m willing to bet some of us have a love/hate fest going on when it comes to these types of apps during your daily workflow. Case in point, it took me a long time to configure mutt the way I want it to work with 2 mail accounts (no, I didn’t short cut it and use Luke Smith’s setup).

On the other hand, I still use T-Bird. Here’s the love/hate - I can’t bring myself to settle on one or the other. T-bird is just damned convenient but I love the “anti-bloat” of using mutt. Because I use both, I have a larger than I prefer home directory.

So, what’s your love/hate scenario based on the topic. Perhaps some of the stories may push me over that edge I need (or help someone else in this same predicament).

My tale(s) won’t help you resolve your concern @Chris I experience the exact same issues (mostly with file managers). I really want to like ranger and/or nnn but end up relying on nemo because it does absolutely everything the way I want… and it uses abut the same memory as pcmanfm. I have tried calendar tools (failed to go cli)… alpine (and stuck with t’bird)…

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At least you have made some commitment, lol
I can’t seem to commit either way sigh

I prefer a GUI email client. It’s easier to use than a text based one like mutt, especially when dealing with html/attachment/hyperlink.

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Yeah - I get that. I pretty much have all that covered in my mutt. It calls up a browser for links, sxiv for images, etc, etc. So you can understand why I hesitate dumping mutt.

At the risk of splitting hairs, I like to use ncurses based applications whenever possible. I like mc as my file manager, mntui is great for connecting to wireless (wish connman had a tool like that), and I preferred to use cdw cd burner back in the days I had to keep permanent records for clients.

The ncurses applications just work. No interference from broken gtk+ themes or issues like the recent thunar trash bug.

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I stopped using email clients since I stopped using MS Office. Thunderbird was too cluttered and buggy, and a poor man’s version of Outlook IMO. For projects I was working on, I set up a Slack channel for the team, some shops used Facebook, and I was like “I don’t use Facebook for reasons of security”.

Geary is simple and to the point. But I don’t use it either. One thing I don’t like about email clients is that they run in the background, and I just use a browser for it anyway. That’s where a CLI reader makes sense. The problem it is more of a PITA to set up than a GUI application. There are terminal emulators like XFCE4’s that use a GUI for the settings, why not have that in a CLI/TUI based email client? Because some develop applications that are over engineered in a way, and why over engineer an email client? It’s email, it’s supposed to be easier for the end user, not harder.

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For my purposes, I like/prefer email clients. But then I have 7 email accounts I use regularly. Not to mention a few that I autoforward to others for filing purposes. I, also, maintain an email library of 7GB+ messages. Browser emails are simply inconvenient/ don’t work for me.

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