Last stage of archlabs installation skips all selected packages from stage 9


#1

Hello everyone,
I was installing ArchLabs Linux on my computer when I came across an issue.
At the 9th part of the installation (Select packages) I have selected the packages I need. However, at the final part of the installation, I get a message saying “warning: skipping target X”.
Replace X with each of my selected packages.

First time installing ArchLabs did not have this issue, and I am installing from the same drive as first time.

Why does it out of a sudden skip all the selected packages? The computer is connected to the internet, and those warning messages go down too fast to understand what is going on.


#2

Hi @valachorux

If I remember correctly, that warning is because there is something duplicated. I think that the package manager detects the package and doesn’t install it because it already exists. I would format and partition the device again


#3

Warnings are not errors, the warnings are pacman telling you it’s skipping the package because it’s already installed either explicitly or as a dependency of another package.

The packages you selected, are they installed?

pacman -Qs your_package

#4

Hi again.
After completely zeroing my hard drive and reinstalling archlabs, it still skips all selected packages. After the installation finished, I checked every single one with pacman -Qs package. None of them were found to be installed.
As for why this is happening, I can’t understand. The warning messages go by too quickly to get any useful information.


#5

Can you grab the latest iso just released yesterday, I’m fairly sure the issue you’re having is with a package that has recently been removed from the arch community repos and was required by some packages at the time. Apologies for the inconvenience.

Latest release should solve this, lemme know


#6

You can use the job control built in to most terminals to help with this kind of stuff in the future, Ctrl-s will pause a running process, Ctrl-q will continue a paused process.

Ctrl-z will pause and background a running process and return you to the shell, typing ‘fg’ and Enter will resume the first paused background process, you can have multiple so using ‘fg NUM’ where NUM is the backgrounded process number.