Boats

Team Holcim-PRB

Winners of the 1st Leg of the Ocean Race (Its still the Whitbread to me)

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What I cant seem to find out is why 11th hour were only 40 mins or so behind around 70 nm from home doing around 20 knots (same speed as Holcim-PRD), but then crossed the finish line about 4 hours after them

Prob’ly there were shifty conditions getting close to land, &/or there were some shinanegans to keep in front of he 3rd place boat I guess

But I cant find any report on it

please insert any missing 'T’s above - fucking keyboard

Live. Sail. Die.

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1926 Alden Schooner Curlew 82ft

How can ya not like a boat that has cannons.

8bit

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Often touted to be the start of the evolution from long to fin keels (I’ll take that cause Maldon is in my home waters)

Sailing yacht ‘Jullanar’, 1875.

This famous yawl-rigged yacht was built in 1875 by E H Bentall. She was a radical departure from the accepted racing yacht design. His intention was to build a yacht with the ‘longest waterline, smallest frictional surface, and shortest keel’. The design eliminated deadwood fore and aft. She was 110 ft 6 ins in length, 16 ft 7 ins in breadth, and had a draught of 13 ft 7 ins.

She was built and designed by an agricultural engineer, E. H. Bentall, to have, in his own words, ‘the longest waterline, the smallest frictional surface, and the shortest keel’. She proved phenomenally fast and during her racing life won more races than any other yacht. Her design was the direct forerunner of such famous yachts as the Prince of Wales’s Britannia, launched in 1893, and Lord Dunraven’s Valkyrie II and Valkyrie III, both challengers for the America’s Cup during the 1890s.

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https://www.oxfordreference.com/display/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803125228879;jsessionid=93D7605F5835EF3EEE9156B38F5B8DEA

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Gloriana

Vessel Name: Gloriana
cutter
00411
1891-02-27
46 Foot-class
Herreshoff, Nathanael Greene
Herreshoff Manufacturing Co
38.9 s ton
Gloriana was built in 1891 for New York Yacht Club (NYYC) member E. D. Morgan to compete in a new 46 foot-class. Gloriana was NGH’s key breakthrough yacht that shifted HMCo from steam vessels back to sail in the 1890s. She was undefeated in her first year of racing and became a sensation in the yachting press because her form was a radical departure from previous boats. The most obvious change was much longer bow and stern overhangs and radical cut away of forward underwater profile, compared to other yachts of this period. Gloriana was built of composite construction (metal framing and wooden planking) to reduce hull weight and retain strength for the purpose of concentrating lead ballast low on her keel. This provided more stability to carry greater sail area. Extending the overhangs forward and aft provided increase in waterline length when heeling (leaning over) under sail, that in turn extended the potential hull speed. She also used a variety of innovative hardware for more efficient sail handling. Gloriana was a hugely disruptive design that altered the way new yachts would be designed for many years. Her success led directly to the first of many America’s Cup defender and contender commissions for HMCo. NGH wrote in later years that in Gloriana’s design he aimed to take advantage of a rule he thought not well devised to limit extreme overhangs, as his original Boston Yacht Club measurement rule of 1867 would have done. (Source HCR - Gloriana text NGH http://research.herreshoff.info/Menu/).

https://webmuseum.mit.edu/detail.php?module=vessels&type=related&kv=1271

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“Denali Rose” is a Nauticat 43; a Sparkman & Stephens designed ocean cruising pilothouse staysail-ketch sailboat built in Finland in 1983.

Let’s break that down: pilothouse staysail-ketch

Indoor bad weather piloting;
Cutter rigged, (two forward sails, second one is the stay-sail):
Ketch; two masts - taller main and smaller mizzen.

Dependable, practical live aboard cruiser. Good for two couples; 2 two person 12hr shifts when needed. Good heavy weather boat; storm jib & mizzen setup will handle serious wind.

That’s what I like about a center cockpit, aft cabin ketch. Two separate cabin areas. Although the mizzen sail can provide around 10-25% of the forward speed; it’s so useful to balance the set making it easy on the autopilot, and make the boat ride well at anchor.

And as an ol’salty dog once told me, “It makes a nice thing to lean against while yer smokin’ yer pipe.”




8bit

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River Colne Smacks

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Cherubs rock!

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From Scuttlebutt Sailing News

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All I can say is wow.

8bit

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Close racing

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