ArchLabs Family Scrapbook


#103

Yep , the Columbians are usually pretty good on descends on the Pro Tour


#104

You’d be surprised. The entrance from the side of the road is almost flat. Downhilling is the challenge for parachuters only.


#105

Downhill is the trick and sought after skill. No doubt.


#106

Cool , but some on the Tour de France lost time going downhill on the big fast ones. As well as up hill I must say.

Sure that MTB Downhill are pretty crazy.

Edit: Anyways, you must be in good shape, cycling s pretty tough somehow ,if one pushes enough.


#107

Different on loose soil and gravel.


#108

@nwg Steel or aluminum frame?


#109

Tried to find a more informative photo, but none of them reflected the reality…

Alu of course. Quite an old bike, but I replaced all the crucial parts.


#110

Wow, nice place in there @nwg

Merida Bikes are pretty good.


#111

Not bad, but windy. :slight_smile:


#112

Yep , I can imagine when one has upfront wind


#113

Okiday, steel frames are making a comeback. Inertia


#114

My former cycling comrade changed to carbon. I will start and probably finish the next season on aluminum.


#115

Carbon fiber? Bet that’s pricey. I suppose it depends upon the course and terrain. 'Round here, many are electing to use the new steel frames for distance over a relatively flat landscape.

Interesting.


#116

Looks like this (in the back):

I’m quite sure I’d prefer alu frames over steel on a track above 100 km.


#117

It really depends upon the course and terrain. The steel isn’t the same used in our childhood Shwinn. It’s a slightly more advanced alloy. Nice bikes.


#118

I suppose I better post one. Here I am on the left with my wife and sons on Xmas day. We were having our yearly toast of Mums champagne at my grandparents grave. Mums was their tipple.


#119

Nice pic of a nice familly out there @Dobbie03

Edit: That s some change from your avatar ! lol


#120

Thanks mate.


#121

So true X)


#122

lol, pretty different.